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Tuesday
Sep262017

Sponsored Post: Loupe, Etleap, Aerospike, Stream, Scalyr, VividCortex, Domino Data Lab, MemSQL, InMemory.Net, Zohocorp

Who's Hiring? 

  • Advertise your job here! 

Fun and Informative Events

  • October 10 Live Webinar. Fast & Frictionless - The Decision Engine for Seamless Digital Business. Join us for a live webinar on Tuesday, October 10 at 11:00 am Pacific Time featuring guest speakers Michele Goetz, Principal Analyst at Forrester Research, and Matthias Baumhof, VP Worldwide Engineering at ThreatMetrix®. A positive customer experience is required for successful enterprise digital transformation. Digital businesses depend on speed and efficiency to drive operational decisions. Making faster, accurate, and real-time customer trust decisions removes friction and delivers superior business outcomes. In this session, you’ll learn: How risk-based authentication leveraging digital identities is key to empowering customer transactions; How real-time customer trust decisions can reduce fraud and improve customer satisfaction; How a high performance Hybrid Memory Architecture (HMA) database helps continuously evaluate across a multitude of factors to drive decisioning at the lowest operational cost. Register now.

  • Advertise your event here!

Cool Products and Services

  • .NET developers dealing with Errors in Production: You know the pain of troubleshooting errors with limited time, limited information, and limited tools. Managers want to know what’s wrong right away, users don’t want to provide log data, and you spend more time gathering information than you do fixing the problem. To fix all that, Loupe was built specifically as a .NET logging and monitoring solution. Loupe notifies you about any errors and tells you all the information you need to fix them. It tracks performance metrics, identifies which errors cause the greatest impact, and pinpoints the root causes. Learn more and try it free today.

  • Enterprise-Grade Database Architecture. The speed and enormous scale of today’s real-time, mission critical applications has exposed gaps in legacy database technologies. Read Building Enterprise-Grade Database Architecture for Mission-Critical, Real-Time Applications to learn: Challenges of supporting digital business applications or Systems of Engagement; Shortcomings of conventional databases; The emergence of enterprise-grade NoSQL databases; Use cases in financial services, AdTech, e-Commerce, online gaming & betting, payments & fraud, and telco; How Aerospike’s NoSQL database solution provides predictable performance, high availability and low total cost of ownership (TCO)

  • What engineering and IT leaders need to know about data science. As data science becomes more mature within an organization, you may be pulled into leading, enabling, and collaborating with data science teams. While there are similarities between data science and software engineering, well intentioned engineering leaders may make assumptions about data science that lead to avoidable conflict and unproductive workflows. Read the full guide to data science for Engineering and IT leaders.

  • Etleap is a Redshift ETL tool that lets you bring all the data everyone wants into Redshift. It's easy enough for analysts to add and manage data connections on their own, without inundating IT/Engineering with requests for help. It takes just minutes to add new connections such as MySQL, Salesforce, S3, and many others, then you can "set it and forget it." Learn more about Redshift ETL with Etleap.

  • InMemory.Net provides a Dot Net native in memory database for analysing large amounts of data. It runs natively on .Net, and provides a native .Net, COM & ODBC apis for integration. It also has an easy to use language for importing data, and supports standard SQL for querying data. http://InMemory.Net

  • www.site24x7.com : Monitor End User Experience from a global monitoring network. 

  • Build, scale and personalize your news feeds and activity streams with getstream.io. Try the API now in this 5 minute interactive tutorial. Stream is free up to 3 million feed updates so it's easy to get started. Client libraries are available for Node, Ruby, Python, PHP, Go, Java and .NET. Stream is currently also hiring Devops and Python/Go developers in Amsterdam. More than 400 companies rely on Stream for their production feed infrastructure, this includes apps with 30 million users. With your help we'd like to ad a few zeros to that number. Check out the job opening on AngelList.

  • Scalyr is a lightning-fast log management and operational data platform.  It's a tool (actually, multiple tools) that your entire team will love.  Get visibility into your production issues without juggling multiple tabs and different services -- all of your logs, server metrics and alerts are in your browser and at your fingertips. .  Loved and used by teams at Codecademy, ReturnPath, Grab, and InsideSales. Learn more today or see why Scalyr is a great alternative to Splunk.

  • VividCortex is a SaaS database monitoring product that provides the best way for organizations to improve their database performance, efficiency, and uptime. Currently supporting MySQL, PostgreSQL, Redis, MongoDB, and Amazon Aurora database types, it's a secure, cloud-hosted platform that eliminates businesses' most critical visibility gap. VividCortex uses patented algorithms to analyze and surface relevant insights, so users can proactively fix future performance problems before they impact customers.

  • MemSQL envisions a world of adaptable databases and flexible data workloads - your data anywhere in real time. Today, global enterprises use MemSQL as a real-time data warehouse to cost-effectively ingest data and produce industry-leading time to insight. MemSQL works in any cloud, on-premises, or as a managed service. Start a free 30 day trial here: memsql.com/download/.

  • Advertise your product or service here!

If you are interested in a sponsored post for an event, job, or product, please contact us for more information.

Click to read more ...

Monday
Sep252017

Adcash - 1 Trillion HTTP Requests Per Month

This is a guest post by Arnaud Granal, CTO at Adcash.

Adcash is a worldwide advertising platform. It belongs to a category called DSP (demand-side platform). A DSP is a platform where anyone can buy traffic from many different adnetworks.

The advertising ecosystem is very fragmented behind the two leaders (Google and Facebook) and DSPs help to solve this fragmentation problem.

If you want to run a campaign across 50 adnetworks, then you can imagine the hassle to do it on each adnetwork (different targetings, minimum to spend, quality issues, etc). What we do, is consolidate the ad inventory of the internet in one place and expose it through a self-service unified interface.

We are a technology provider; if you want to buy native advertisement, if you want to buy popups, if you want to buy banners, then it is your choice. The platform is free to use, we take a % on the success.

A platform like Adcash has to run on a very lean budget, you do not earn big money, you get micro-cents per transaction. It is not unusual to earn less than 0.0001 USD per impression.

Oh, by the way, we have 100 ms to take a decision.

Friday
Sep222017

Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For September 22nd, 2017

Hey, it's HighScalability time: 

 

Ever feel like howling at the universe? (Greg Rakozy)

 

If you like this sort of Stuff then please support me on Patreon.

 

  • 10 billion: API calls made every second in Google datacenters; $767,758,000,000: collected by Apple on iPhones sold to the end of June; 20: watts of power consumed by human brain, autonomous vehicles peak at 3000 watts; 59%: drop in leads using AMP; 27%: success rate of AIs guessing passwords; 2.8 kilometers: distance devices running on almost zero power can xmit using backscatter; 96: age at which Lotfi Zadeh, inventor of Fuzzy Logic, passed away; 35%: store time series data in a RDBMS; $1.1 billion: Google's spend on self-driving tech;  $5.1 billion: Slack valuation; 15%: bugs reduced by strong typing; ~1 ft: new smartphone GPS accuracy; 

  • Quotable Quotes:
    • Napoleon: [Sir Hudson Lowe] was a man wanting in education and judgment. He was a stupid man, he knew nothing at all of the world, and like all men who knew nothing of the world, he was suspicious and jealous.
    • Rich Werner: Data center operations, to me, is 362 days of boredom. And then you get these hurricanes coming through, and it’s three days of pulling your hair out.
    • @pacoid: @kenneth0stanley #TheAIConf "We're not interested in complexity for its own sake" -- ref. operational closure in second-order cybernetics
    • Animats: Much as I like Rust, I have to agree. When you have to get it done, use Go. When you want to explore advanced experimental programming constructs, use Rust. The Go guys knew when to stop. Arguably they stopped too early, before generics or parameterized types, and "interface[]" is used too much. But that doesn't seem to be a big overhead item. Rust has the complexity of C++ plus additional complexity from the functional community. Plus lots of fancy template cruft.
    • @mims: People who say data is the new oil are wrong. Non-volatile flash memory is the new oil.
    • @cmeik: As former member of a NoSQL startup, "Safety, reliability [as well as pay up front, save later] doesn't sell" sure sounds familiar.
    • @PaulDJohnston: ... simply because we've had 20 years of "servers" and 10 years of "instances" and now "containers"... they are all the same...
    • Venkatraman Ramakrishnan~ Inventions in one discipline can build on—and spur—basic research in many others, often unwittingly. It’s a virtuous cycle, and scientists take joy in exploiting all of it. Scientists are very promiscuous and the good ones are the most promiscuous.
    • @rightfold: Most of programmers learn early to avoid premature optimization. Next step: teach people about premature distributed computing.
    • @indievc: “Not heroine…Not cocaine….But Venture Capital is the drug flowing through the veins of most Silicon Valley startups”
    • @skamille: Editing is a different profession than writing, but code review and programming are both performed by the same people
    • XNormal: Mainframes had the reputation of being very expensive. But this is misleading. In terms of cost per processing task they were much more efficient than mini and microcomputers.
    • @swardley: "Culture eats strategy for breakfast" is code for "I don't know what the heck I'm talking about but this meme sounds smart"
    • James Glanz: Yet another data center, west of Houston, was so well prepared for the storm — with backup generators, bunks and showers — that employees’ displaced family members took up residence and United States marshals used it as a headquarters until the weather passed.
    • @pacoid: Neuroevolution talk @kenneth0stanley #theaiconf -- "exact gradient is not always the best move"; evolution uses fitness fn, not objective fn
    • @GossiTheDog: Holy crap. CCleaner trojan 1st stage payload is on 700k PCs, with these orgs targeted for 2nd stage (successfully) 
    • Scott Aaronson: In the meantime, the survival of the human race might hinge on people’s ability to understand much smaller numbers than 10^122: for example, a billion, a trillion, and other numbers that characterize the exponential growth of our civilization and the limits that we’re now running up against.
    • Timothy Morgan: Compute and networking could hit the Moore’s Law wall at about the same time, and that is precisely what we expect.
    • ralmidani: As I've said before, universal web components are a pipe dream. Developers disagree on even the most trivial things, like the best way to parse a query string. What makes anyone think those disagreements will magically disappear once web components become a standard?
    • Mallory Locklear: [Virus] Jumps between species have driven most major evolutionary innovations in the viruses. Meanwhile, co-divergence has been less common than was assumed and has mostly caused incremental changes.
    • @SwiftOnSecurity: Linux is like if the creator of git wrote an operating system.
    • A troll ate the rest of the quotes. Luckily, if luck it be, a copy was made and you can read all of them by clicking through to the full post.

    Don't miss all that the Internet has to say on Scalability, click below and become eventually consistent with all scalability knowledge (which means this post has many more items to read so please keep on reading)...

    Click to read more ...

Monday
Sep182017

Evolution of data structures in Yandex.Metrica

Yandex.Metrica is the world's second largest web analytics system. Metrica takes in a stream of data representing events that took place on sites or on apps. Our task is to process this data and present it in an analyzable form.


Processing the data in itself is not a problem. The real difficulty lies in trying to determine what form the processed results should be saved in so that they are easy to work with. During the development process, we had to completely change our approach to data storage organization several times. We started with MyISAM tables, then used LSM-trees and eventually came up with column-oriented database, ClickHouse. In this article I'll explain what led us to settle on this last option.

Yandex.Metrica was launched in 2008 and has now been running for more than nine years. Every time we changed our approach to data storage in the past it was because a particular solution proved inefficient: either there was insufficient performance reserve, or the solution was unreliable, or it used too many computational resources, or it just did not allow us to implement what we needed to.

The old Yandex.Metrica for websites has more than 40 "fixed" report types (for example, the visitor geography report), several in-page analytics tools (like click maps), Webvisor (which lets you study individual user actions in great detail), as well as the separate report constructor.

With the new Metrica and Appmetrica, you can customize every report instead of dealing with "fixed" types. You can add new dimensions (for example, in a search term report you can break data down further by landing page), segment and compare (between, let's say, traffic sources for all visitors vs. visitors from San Francisco), change your set of metrics, etc. The new system, therefore, demands a completely different approach to data storage than what we used earlier.

MyISAM

Click to read more ...

Friday
Sep152017

Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For September 15th, 2017

Hey, it's HighScalability time: 

 

Earth received Cassini’s final signal at 7:55am ET. Let's bid a fond farewell. After a 13-year tour of duty, job well done!

 

If you like this sort of Stuff then please support me on Patreon.

 

  • 12.9 million: DynamoDB requests per second on Prime Day; 4 billion: transistors on Apple's A11 Bionic chip; 4x: extreme weather events since 1970; 51: qubit device; 50%: Messenger.com converted to Reason56.6 million: US cord cutters; 5000: bikes abandoned at Burning Man; 500 million: yearly visitors to Apple stores; 30 min: time to send one HD color image from Mars to Earth; 

  • Quoteable Quotes:
    • @randyshoup: Interesting idea of a *Negative* MTTR by @adrianco: notice something is going to fail and proactively fix it before it breaks!
    • @rob_pike: "The Equifax executives who let my data be stolen will probably suffer fewer consequences than I will for an overdue library book." @nytimes
    • @avantgame: on weaponized social media: "We’re in an information war with Russia. It’s time we started acting like it."
    • Jamie Dimon: It's [Bitcoin] worse than tulip bulbs. It won't end well. Someone is going to get killed
    • @manisha72617183: First they tell you that Scrum is not a magic bullet.Then they spend the rest of the time saying how it’s the best thing since sliced bread🙄
    • yogthos: My team has been using Clojure for 7 years now, and we're very happy with it. It's still a pleasure to work with, and the stability of the language has been really welcome.
    • @GossiTheDog: Another way of looking at Equifax is they did an incredible job of keeping infrastructure that size with that much legacy secure for so long
    • API Evangelist: when it comes to the shear volume, and regular drumbeat of serverless stories Microsoft is keeping pace. After watching several months of sustained storytelling, it looks like they could even pass up Amazon in the near future.
    • amelius: Well, I hear a lot of people complaining that the results on DuckDuckGo are still worse than on Google, even though both search-engines produce results within a second. And these are people that really want to quit using Google for privacy reasons. I never hear people complaining that a search is slow. So I do think that search-quality is where the competition is happening.
    • @SwiftOnSecurity: How you think multinational hypercorps get hacked: NSA 0days on the black market How multinational hypercorps get hacked: admin/admin
    • m-masa: Snapchat to me is sharing your shaky drunken escapades at 3AM with your friends to let them know you made it home and survived the night. Instagram seems more like an endless observation of copy-and-paste, superficial things and people and places. It's evolved more into a (usually inaccurate) portrayal of status than anything else.
    • Dmitri Zimine: When Serverless replaces micro-services, it is not going to be free lunch either. We are paying by introducing more complexity, now for the benefit of massive cost savings.
    • Kris De Decker: In London, a solar panel produces 65 times less energy on a heavy overcast day in December at 10 am than on a sunny day in June at noon
    • nostrademons: The real interesting work in search is in ranking functions, and this is where nobody comes close to Google. Some of this, as other commenters note, is because Google has more data than anyone else. Some of it is just because there've been more man-hours poured into it. IMHO, it's pretty doubtful that an open-source project could attract that sort of focused knowledge-work (trust me; it's pretty laborious) when Google will pay half a mil per year for skilled information-retrieval Ph.Ds.
    • rkangel: Up to now this is all classic Eve - betrayal by people you trust. The postscript is less nice though: gigx in a moment of anger asked in in game chat for real life contact details for TheJudge so that he could 'cut off his hands'. This is obviously not OK and CCP banned gigx permanently. This has the side-effect of putting the final nail in the CO2 coffin.
    • Rick Altherr: At one point I did that calculation and I was seeing one hard drive die every five minutes. 
    • EliE: the fundamental reason why ransomware is so successful, and here to stay, is that people simply don’t backup their data.
    • EliE: no matter how many times the bitcoins are moved, ultimately they must be cashed out at exchange points. So we just need to keep tracing movements until we reach a cash-out wallet.
    • @radjanirad: Just a few hours ago, Cassini received the command to turn off the RADAR instrument - for the last time. :( #cassini
    • @postwait: Most monitoring "innovations" have been mostly aesthetic, but their marketing is deafening and drowns out real innovation. #UphillBattle
    • pab: I have two years experience pair programming, and to quote asthasr, I found it an absolute slog.
    • @matthew_d_green: I have an idea. Let's combine all the hard parts of cryptography with all the asshole parts of the finance industry.
    • Pete Saia: It’s important to understand that it isn’t all or nothing. Serverless is in our future, but it isn’t our exclusive future.
    • Errata Security: The 9,000 devices were split almost evenly between Apple and Android. Almost all of the Apple devices randomized their addresses. About a third of the Android devices randomized. (This assumes Android only randomizes the final 3 bytes of the address, and that Apple randomizes all 6 bytes -- my assumption may be wrong).
    • David Rosenthal: Today's eclipse records would be on the Web, not paper or bone. Will astronomers 3200 or even only 580 years from now be able to use them?
    • Peter Zaitsev: To be competitive with non-open-source cloud deployment options, open source databases need to invest in “ease-of-use.” There is no tolerance for complexity in many development teams as we move to “ops-less” deployment models.
    • Jeremy Hsu: the advantage of the flip-flop qubit comes from inducing an electric dipole—separation of positive and negative charges—by pulling the electron a little bit away from the nucleus of the phosphorus atoms (which are themselves embedded in silicon). That electric dipole enables the spin-based silicon qubits to remain entangled together over longer distances and able to influence one another through quantum physics.
    • Cory Doctorow: All these forms of cheating treat the owner of the device as an enemy of the company that made or sold it, to be thwarted, tricked, or forced into con­ducting their affairs in the best interest of the com­pany’s shareholders. To do this, they run programs and processes that attempt to hide themselves and their nature from their owners, and proxies for their owners (like reviewers and researchers).
    • Jonathan Golden: How do you know, though, when to pull resources away from other growth initiatives to address these edge cases? My rule of thumb was when a problem was occurring at least 50 times a day, it was time to solve it more holistically. At a time when we were growing anywhere from 300%–600% per year — and edge cases were growing at least as fast — that’s when the potential explosion of problems proliferated.
    • A Mind at Play: Well, the good of this command is that if you’re in a loop you can have this command in that loop and every time it goes around the loop it will put a pulse in and you will hear a frequency equal to how long it takes to go around that loop. And then you can put another one in some bigger loop and so on. And so you’ll hear all of this coming on and you’ll hear this “boo boo boo boo boo boo,” and his concept was that you would soon learn to listen to that and know whether when it got hung up in a loop or something else or what it was doing all this time, which he’d never been able to tell before.

    Don't miss all that the Internet has to say on Scalability, click below and become eventually consistent with all scalability knowledge (which means this post has many more items to read so please keep on reading)...

    Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Sep132017

Have you noticed there's a lot more collaboration going on these days? Why?

 

Thanks to zero marginal cost digital production methods, we're seeing content markets—for the first time—develop in conditions free from supply and price constraints.

In the process we've learned something: consumers have an unquenchable thirst for new content; content creators are willing to oblige with an equally prodigious stream of new content; platforms that best control access to the customer are the biggest winners; the reward for content creators varies drastically by medium and platform.

For consumers, life is now a streaming fixed priced buffet of unending variety and diversion.

For producers, the changes have been terrifying. Old modes have crumbled, leaving everyone scrambling to figure out what, if anything, comes next.

To adapt, content creators are learning to exploit capture loops, bundling, and collaboration to extract money from a digital economy that has collectively decided it rarely wants to pay artists directly for their content anymore.

The most highly evolved form of digital content platform strategies can be found in the book market. Why? Because Amazon.

Kindle Unlimited is the Clear Platform Winner

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Sep122017

Sponsored Post: Close.io, Loupe, Etleap, Aerospike, Stream, Scalyr, VividCortex, Domino Data Lab, MemSQL, InMemory.Net, Zohocorp

Who's Hiring? 

  • Close.io is a ~25 person fully remote team that is profitable and building a product our customers love! We’re hiring Senior Backend Developers to join our team. Our backend tech stack currently includes Python (Flask, Gunicorn, TaskTiger), Elasticsearch, MongoDB, Postgres, and Redis running in Docker/Kubernetes on AWS. Learn more and apply here!

  • Advertise your job here! 

Fun and Informative Events

  • October 10 Live Webinar. Fast & Frictionless - The Decision Engine for Seamless Digital Business. Join us for a live webinar on Tuesday, October 10 at 11:00 am Pacific Time featuring guest speakers Michele Goetz, Principal Analyst at Forrester Research, and Matthias Baumhof, VP Worldwide Engineering at ThreatMetrix®. A positive customer experience is required for successful enterprise digital transformation. Digital businesses depend on speed and efficiency to drive operational decisions. Making faster, accurate, and real-time customer trust decisions removes friction and delivers superior business outcomes. In this session, you’ll learn: How risk-based authentication leveraging digital identities is key to empowering customer transactions; How real-time customer trust decisions can reduce fraud and improve customer satisfaction; How a high performance Hybrid Memory Architecture (HMA) database helps continuously evaluate across a multitude of factors to drive decisioning at the lowest operational cost. Register now.

  • Advertise your event here!

Cool Products and Services

  • .NET developers dealing with Errors in Production: You know the pain of troubleshooting errors with limited time, limited information, and limited tools. Managers want to know what’s wrong right away, users don’t want to provide log data, and you spend more time gathering information than you do fixing the problem. To fix all that, Loupe was built specifically as a .NET logging and monitoring solution. Loupe notifies you about any errors and tells you all the information you need to fix them. It tracks performance metrics, identifies which errors cause the greatest impact, and pinpoints the root causes. Learn more and try it free today.

  • Enterprise-Grade Database Architecture. The speed and enormous scale of today’s real-time, mission critical applications has exposed gaps in legacy database technologies. Read Building Enterprise-Grade Database Architecture for Mission-Critical, Real-Time Applications to learn: Challenges of supporting digital business applications or Systems of Engagement; Shortcomings of conventional databases; The emergence of enterprise-grade NoSQL databases; Use cases in financial services, AdTech, e-Commerce, online gaming & betting, payments & fraud, and telco; How Aerospike’s NoSQL database solution provides predictable performance, high availability and low total cost of ownership (TCO)

  • What engineering and IT leaders need to know about data science. As data science becomes more mature within an organization, you may be pulled into leading, enabling, and collaborating with data science teams. While there are similarities between data science and software engineering, well intentioned engineering leaders may make assumptions about data science that lead to avoidable conflict and unproductive workflows. Read the full guide to data science for Engineering and IT leaders.

  • Etleap is a Redshift ETL tool that lets you bring all the data everyone wants into Redshift. It's easy enough for analysts to add and manage data connections on their own, without inundating IT/Engineering with requests for help. It takes just minutes to add new connections such as MySQL, Salesforce, S3, and many others, then you can "set it and forget it." Learn more about Redshift ETL with Etleap.

  • InMemory.Net provides a Dot Net native in memory database for analysing large amounts of data. It runs natively on .Net, and provides a native .Net, COM & ODBC apis for integration. It also has an easy to use language for importing data, and supports standard SQL for querying data. http://InMemory.Net

  • www.site24x7.com : Monitor End User Experience from a global monitoring network. 

  • Build, scale and personalize your news feeds and activity streams with getstream.io. Try the API now in this 5 minute interactive tutorial. Stream is free up to 3 million feed updates so it's easy to get started. Client libraries are available for Node, Ruby, Python, PHP, Go, Java and .NET. Stream is currently also hiring Devops and Python/Go developers in Amsterdam. More than 400 companies rely on Stream for their production feed infrastructure, this includes apps with 30 million users. With your help we'd like to ad a few zeros to that number. Check out the job opening on AngelList.

  • Scalyr is a lightning-fast log management and operational data platform.  It's a tool (actually, multiple tools) that your entire team will love.  Get visibility into your production issues without juggling multiple tabs and different services -- all of your logs, server metrics and alerts are in your browser and at your fingertips. .  Loved and used by teams at Codecademy, ReturnPath, Grab, and InsideSales. Learn more today or see why Scalyr is a great alternative to Splunk.

  • VividCortex is a SaaS database monitoring product that provides the best way for organizations to improve their database performance, efficiency, and uptime. Currently supporting MySQL, PostgreSQL, Redis, MongoDB, and Amazon Aurora database types, it's a secure, cloud-hosted platform that eliminates businesses' most critical visibility gap. VividCortex uses patented algorithms to analyze and surface relevant insights, so users can proactively fix future performance problems before they impact customers.

  • MemSQL envisions a world of adaptable databases and flexible data workloads - your data anywhere in real time. Today, global enterprises use MemSQL as a real-time data warehouse to cost-effectively ingest data and produce industry-leading time to insight. MemSQL works in any cloud, on-premises, or as a managed service. Start a free 30 day trial here: memsql.com/download/.

  • Advertise your product or service here!

If you are interested in a sponsored post for an event, job, or product, please contact us for more information.

Click to read more ...

Friday
Sep082017

Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For September 8th, 2017

Hey, it's HighScalability time: 

 

May you live in interesting times. China games swarming drone attacks. Portable EMP anyone? (Tech in Asia)

 

If you like this sort of Stuff then please support me on Patreon.

 

  • 100GB: entire corpus of articles written at the NY Times; 80GB: data for one human genome; 3%: Linux desktop market share; 3.5M: fake Wells Fargo accounts; $18,000: world’s most expensive vacuum; 2000: Netflix recommender taste groups; 27%: year-over year-growth rate of Python on SO; 4M: Time Warner hacked; 143M: Equifax hacked; $800M: ICO funding in Q2; $257M: Filecoin ICO; 

  • Quotable Quotes:
    • Brendan Gregg: jobs are also migrating from both Solaris and Linux to cloud jobs instead, specifically AWS. The market for OS and kernel development roles is actually shrinking a little. The OS is becoming a forgotten cog in a much larger cloud-based system. The job growth is in distributed systems, cloud SRE, data science, cloud network engineering, traffic and chaos engineering, container scheduling, and other new roles. 
    • @DrQz: The Performance Paradox: The better u do ur job, the more invisible u become. https://goo.gl/1aTRvw  🐵 🙄
    • @kennwhite: $100,000+ spent on thousands of [Facebook] ads, tied to on 470 fake accounts, all linked to a propaganda troll farm with ~600 staff in St. Petersburg.Kenn White added,
    • marssaxman: 10.6.8 was the best Mac OS ever. Since then I've felt increasingly uncomfortable with the heavy-handed, paternalistic direction Apple has been taking their OS; it just doesn't feel like home anymore. I believe in personal computers as tools of personal empowerment; it's my machine, not Apple's. I really resent being told what I can and can't do with it, and I neither need nor want an itunes account.
    • @jemangs: "Amazon spent $16.1 billion on R&D last year, a figure that should strike fear into its competitors" - Recode
    • @xaprb: OH: "I have some really junior staff and they were bitching about having to wait 5 minutes for an EC2 instance. GET OFFA MY LAWN."
    • Nora Jones: Chaos doesn't cause problems, it reveals them. 
    • Littlefinger: chaos is a latter.
    • Ken Stanley: sometimes in order to make discovery possible, you have to stop having an objective
    • GeneticGenesis: Whenever a "config change" (Note: this includes adding or removing targets to a target group, EG Autoscaling) happens on an ALB, the ALB drops all active connections, and re-establishes them at once, at high load, this obviously causes significant load spikes on any underlying service.
    • Stefano Bernardi: Call me old fashioned, but wanting to raise half a billion dollars for a pre-product endeavor is absolutely f*cking insane.
    • revscat: This was my first experience with modern JavaScript frameworks and TypeScript. I wanted to do it right, so worked closely with team members who were more versed in this stuff, and followed the various recommended best practices. By the time all was said and done the PR for this thing had 27 files in it. For a modal. This seems ludicrous to me. 
    • Tony Seba: [on disruption] Technology convergence is when several technologies and business model innovations converge at one point in time to enable functionality at a certain cost.
    • Tony Seba: Business model innovation is every bit as disruptive as technological innovation.
    • Tony Seba: By 2030 95% of all passenger miles are going to be autonomous electronic vehicles. There goes the internal combustion engine industry. There goes the individual ownership of cars. We will have cars as a service just as we have movies as a service. 
    • @Noahpinion: 15 years ago, the internet was an escape from the real world. Now, the real world is an escape from the internet.
    • @jbeda: Hot take: [new AWS LB] similar to but more limited to GCP L3 LB. AWS LB is zonal and looks to do NAT. GCP L3 LB supports anycast across regions and DSR.
    • @GossiTheDog: Tip - if you want in to a bunch of factory networks, don't target the companies - target their ICS suppliers. Find names via case studies.
    • @GossiTheDog: Because vendors usually self managed black box VPN appliances at sites, the actual company doesn't see logs = doesn't know they are owned.
    • @ftrain: Giant company: We are geniuses worth a trillion dollars. Me: I would like to log into two different accounts at once. Company: Holy shit.
    • @GossiTheDog: Equifax's infrastructure is a weird mix of IBM WebSphere, Apache Struts, Java.. it's like stepping back in time a decade.
    • catvalente: “The Internet used to be full of original content & lively debate” is the new “in my day we walked to school in the snow uphill both ways”
    • Lots of quotes make a web page too heavy for the computer to lift, so I saved them for the full page, which is made of unobtanium. Please click through to read the rest...

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Friday
Sep012017

Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For September 1st, 2017

Hey, it's HighScalability time: 

Obviously, cloud native is simplicity itself. (Cloud Native Landscape Project)

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  • $10: price for IPv4 address (and falling); 10-15%: better IPv6 network performance; 711M: Record Onliner Spambot Dump; 41.4-tesla: strongest resistive magnet; 85%: cell towers offline due to Hurricane Harvey; 1M: Facebook accounts turned off every single day; 700K: Lyft drivers; $160B: Crypto Market Cap; $1.5M: bounty for iPhone jail break; 2.93M: pirated views of Mayweather-McGregor fight; 465k: people need to update pacemaker firmware; 70,065,920: views of Taylor Swift in 2 days; 2 trillion: kafka messages per day at LinkedIn; $35 billion: saved when planes fly themselves; 990: bird species in North America; 108B: number of people who have ever lived; 500M: DuckDuckGo anonymous searches in one month; 

  • Quotable Quotes:
    • @asymco: The iPhone is not only the best selling product of all time but it may be the most used. 60 trillion minutes a year.
    • @Nick_Craver: Stack Overflow Questions (last 30 days): 1,280,911,699 Hits 26.92 ms Avg Render Time 11,040,996,940 SQL Queries 4,489,374,544 Redis Hits
    • @GBrayUT: Rough CDN numbers [for Stack Overflow] from bosun ~2000 hits/sec to sstatic at peak. Comes out to another 885 million hits/week, or ~3.8 billion CDN Hits/30 days
    • @msuriar: Why is loadshedding such a thing at Google? Because in 2009 we had 3 public visible Gmail outages. #SREcon
    • @phoronix: The @AMDRyzen #Threadripper 1950X managing a #Linux kernel build in about 36 seconds, not bad!
    • @cmeik: When I told Barbara Liskov that some applications didn't need serializability she gasped.
    • Dan Lyons: A century ago, factory workers went on strike to demand better conditions. Today, startup "hustlers" celebrate their own exploitation. 
    • @nigewillson: Forget 20+ Billion #IOT devices by 2020, imagine the Disruption from 1 billion drones by 2030 !  http://ab.co/2wnLXfi  #drones @thomasfrey
    • @markcallaghan: Peak write rate might be 20% better in recent MyRocks. FlushWAL might be why
    • nnfy: Threadripper is not just about speed. It is about PCIE lanes. Intel has been taking advantage of its monopoly for decades, artificially limiting PCIE lane count, among other things. This may be the start of a new era in computing, allowing GPGPUs to be used more readily, not to mention specific neural network and deep learning applications.
    • api: Most ICO projects are complete and utter vapor consisting of nothing more than a stock bootstrap web site and a "white paper" that could have been generated by a Markov chain model using crypto and decentralized systems buzzwords. A few have a bit of code online that doesn't work. Of those that have shipped most of them are unusable, and of those that are usable I am only aware of maybe one or two that are at all interesting. Of those none are very compelling and none are things I couldn't do without. There are literally no hits in this space. It's all junk, and most of it is outright scams. I'd be surprised if a single current generation coin ever actually delivers real ROI.
    • @sarahmei: 1. Software is not about rigor. It's about mapping what people want onto what machines can do. It's messy, it's chaotic, it's wonderful.
    • @QuinnyPig: #SREcon "How did you get management support for this?" @ING: "We put them into the on-call rotation." Oh my god it's brilliant.
    • @PaulDJohnston: You can never know all of AWS. So don't try.
    • retox: Only on HN would targeting 100 million devices for a preview be seen as small fry.
    • Ann Mutschler: the retina’s 1 million or so ganglion cells are composed of about 20 distinct types. Each plays a slightly different role in transmitting the perception of shape, color, depth, motion and other visual features to the brain.
    • Stack Overflow: Python and R are associated with a country’s income. Python is visited about twice as often in high-income countries as in the rest of the world, and R about three times as much.
    • Itai Gurari: Human: What is the purpose of existence? Machine: to find out what happens when we get to the planet earth
    • @CodeWisdom: "A language that doesn’t affect the way you think about programming is not worth knowing." - Alan Perlis
    • Team Shellphish: Kubernetes (kubernetes.io) - The distribution of docker containers across our cluster, and the load-balancing and failover of resources, was handled by kubernetes. In our final setup, the Mechanical Phish was so resilient that it could probably continue to function in some form even if the rack was hit with a shotgun blast.
    • Jeff Dorsch: What is clear, given the focus of presentations, is that the bleeding edge of computing has shifted significantly in the past 12 months. While performance and power are still critical elements, the primary concern is no longer how to cram more transistors on a piece of silicon or how to put multiple chips together. It is now much more geared toward new architectures that can bridge the digital and physical worlds.
    • Karen Stabiner: “At least once a week, I get something about a new start-up with a new gadget that’s going to make our lives so much better,” said Sisha Ortuzar, Mr. Colicchio’s partner at ‘Wichcraft. “They’re distractions. We just want to get back to making sandwiches.”
    • Lila MacLellan: And everything changed. Pre-Keith, Dwyer explains, “it was very clear no one took us seriously and everybody thought we were just idiots.” When “Keith” contacted collaborators, Gazin says, “they’d be like ‘Okay, bro, yeah, let’s brainstorm!’”
    • userbinator: Looks like those Seagates are still disappointingly failure-prone, while HGST remains the most reliable.
    • ISTC: network bandwidth already available today can be on par with the main memory bandwidth.
    • Michael P Frank: This idea of reversible computing goes to the very heart of thermo­dynamics and information theory, and indeed it is the only possible way within the laws of physics that we might be able to keep improving the cost and energy efficiency of general-purpose computing far into the future.
    • jcampbell1: Grammarly absolutely crushed it with Adwords on the content network. There was so much cheap inventory they were able to buy such as on dictionary sites.
    • There is a bit of a Y Combinator attitude against buying advertising to build a startup. If it ain't viral, then the product isn't good enough. 
    • jedberg: [Amazon] absolutely will not look at your data under any circumstance, even if you specifically ask them to. Multiple times I was trying to troubleshoot an issue and asked them to "just log into the database" and they said they have very strict policies against that. There is no way they have any of Target's data.
    • @benthompson: The fundamental failing in discipline after discipline is the overvaluing of what can be measured, and the dismissal of what can not.
    • dmitrygr: I read the paper. Still not sure how this [Mercury Protocol: Communication Platform Built on the Ethereum Blockchain] solves anything besides transferring wealth from the gullible to the authors:
    • @Nick_Craver: Code review just now: a errant boolean check in our Master.cshtml can cost upwards of 100 million hits to redis a day. Crazy to think about.
    • moxious: First, the idea of running a distributed ledger to keep track of burger points. This is the tech equivalent of using a bazooka to address an ant problem.
      • mcgarnagle: Say what you will, at least the whoppercoins are backed by something that has survived the test of time, the whopper.
    • contingencies: For financial transaction services I can recommend sharding first by customer, then by ledger. As a result, instead of enforcing double-entry book-keeping standards within a single database, do it at an application-specific middleware server layer to enforce only the guarantees you need.
    • @stevesi: AR by itself isn't a platform but it is precisely the kind of platform feature that makes cross-platform impossible.
    • Camillo Bruni: Changing the property or element type typically causes V8 to create a different HiddenClass which can lead to type pollution which prevents V8 from generating optimal code
    • redwood: I lived in a country where everyone has a power generator in their building. Let's just say the quality of life was significantly lower. This cloud shift is like an unstoppable tidal wave. I'm always surprised when I hear people with your argument [that the cloud is not a utility]
    • Tim Harford: It’s not simply that Blade Runner fumbled its futurism by failing to anticipate the smartphone. That’s a forgivable slip, and Blade Runner is hardly the only film to make it. It’s that, when asked to think about how new inventions might shape the future, our imaginations tend to leap to technologies that are sophisticated beyond comprehension.
    • @krishnan: For Google, Kubernetes is just an enterprise trojan horse to onboard customers to their cloud 
    • @roboYeti: Started playing with KSQL. Joining tables with streams from my Kafka topics -no problem. @jaykreps it's awesome piece of Engineering. Thanks
    • Tom Griffiths: This is a moment where we are starting to recognize that we're going to need to interact with systems that, at least in restricted domains, are going to be smarter than us. Thinking about how to design those interfaces between humans and machines in ways that make it possible for us to interact with those systems in a way that allows us to function effectively is an important research challenge, and a significant social challenge.
    • mrmrcoleman: At a previous company we had a 'farm' of test phones that we used for testing new versions of software. A large number of those test were 'stress testing' which would probably be analogous to the sort of load you would have it they were to be treated as a 'datacenter'. Based on that I'm pretty sure that the biggest issue with managing the cluster would be the extremely high failure rate. That's not to say that this won't work because I haven't done the maths, but it kid a unique challenge.
    • Michael Mullany: What I take away from my analysis of these Hype Cycles is not just how difficult it is to make predictions, and how much wasted effort goes into technologies that doesn't tend to work, but also how exciting and wondrous is the progress that we've made in technology. The labor of the last two decades has given rise to an Age of Wonders

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Tuesday
Aug292017

Sponsored Post: Close.io, Loupe, Etleap, Aerospike, Stream, Scalyr, VividCortex, Domino Data Lab, MemSQL, InMemory.Net, Zohocorp

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