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Friday
Aug292014

Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For August 29th, 2014

Hey, it's HighScalability time:


In your best Carl Sagan voice...Billions and Billions of Habitable Planets.
  • Quotable Quotes:
    • @Kurt_Vonnegut: Another flaw in the human character is that everybody wants to build and nobody wants to do maintenance.
    • @neil_conway: "The paucity of innovation in calculating join predicate selectivities is truly astounding."
    • @KentBeck: power law walks into a bar. bartender says, "i've seen a hundred power laws. nobody orders anything." power law says, "1000 beers, please".
    • @CompSciFact: RT @jfcloutier: Prolog: thinking in proofs Erlang: thinking in processes UML: wishful thinking

  • For your acoustic listening pleasure let me present...The Orbiting Vibes playing Scaling Doesn't Matter. I don't quite understand how it relates to scaling, but my deep learning algorithm likes it. 

  • The Rise of the Algorithm. Another interesting podcast with James Allworth and Ben Thompson. Much pondering of how to finance content. Do you trust content with embedded affiliate links? Do you trust content written by writers judged on their friendliness to advertisers? Why trust at all is the bigger question. Facebook is the soft news advertisers love. Twitter is the hard news advertisers avoid. A traditional newspaper combined both. Humans are the new horses. < Capitalism doesn't care if people are employed anymore than it cared about horses being employed. Employment is simply a byproduct of inefficient processes. The Faith that the future will provide is deliciously ironic given the rigorous rationalism underlying most of the episodes.

  • Great reading list for Berkeley CS286: Implementation of Database Systems, Fall 2014. 

  • Is it just me or is it totally weird that all the spy systems use the same diagrams that any other project would use? It makes it seem so...normal. The Surveillance Engine: How the NSA Built Its Own Secret Google.

  • The Mathematics of Herding Sheep. By little border collie Annie embodies a very smart algorithm to herd sheep:  When sheep become dispersed beyond a certain point, dogs put their effort into rounding them up, reintroducing predatory pressure into the herd, which responds according to selfish herd principles, bunching tightly into a more cohesive unit. < What's so disturbing is how well this algorithm works with people.

  • Inside Google's Secret Drone-Delivery Program. What I really want are pick-up drones, where I send my drone to pick stuff up. Or are pick-up and delivery cars a better bet? Though I can see swarms of drones delivering larger objects in parts that self-assemble

  • Lambda Architecture at Indix: "break down the various stages in your data pipeline into the layers of the architecture and choose technologies and frameworks that satisfy the specific requirements of each layer."

Don't miss all that the Internet has to say on Scalability, click below and become eventually consistent with all scalability knowledge (which means this post has many more items to read so please keep on reading)...

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Wednesday
Aug272014

The 1.2M Ops/Sec Redis Cloud Cluster Single Server Unbenchmark

This is a guest post by Itamar Haber, Chief Developers Advocate, Redis Labs.

While catching up with the world the other day, I read through the High Scalability guest post by Anshu and Rajkumar's from Aerospike (great job btw). I really enjoyed the entire piece and was impressed by the heavy tweaking that they did to their EC2 instance to get to the 1M mark, but I kept wondering - how would Redis do?

I could have done a full-blown benchmark. But doing a full-blown benchmark is a time- and resource-consuming ordeal. And that's without taking into account the initial difficulties of comparing apples, oranges and other sorts of fruits. A real benchmark is a trap, for it is no more than an effort deemed from inception to be backlogged. But I wanted an answer, and I wanted it quick, so I was willing to make a few sacrifices to get it. That meant doing the next best thing - an unbenchmark.

An unbenchmark is, by (my very own) definition, nothing like a benchmark (hence the name). In it, you cut every corner and relax every assumption to get a quick 'n dirty ballpark figure. Leaning heavily on the expertise of the guys in our labs, we measured the performance of our Redis Cloud software without any further optimizations. We ran our unbenchmark with the following setup:

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Monday
Aug252014

MixRadio Architecture - Playing with an Eclectic Mix of Services

This is a guest repost by Steve Robbins, Chief Architect at MixRadio.

At MixRadio, we offer a free music streaming service that learns from listening habits to deliver people a personalised radio station, at the single touch of a button. MixRadio marries simplicity with an incredible level of personalization, for a mobile-first approach that will help everybody, not just the avid music fan, enjoy and discover new music. It's as easy as turning on the radio, but you're in control - just one touch of Play Me provides people with their own personal radio station.
 
The service also offers hundreds of hand-crafted expert and celebrity mixes categorised by genre and mood for each region. You can also create your own artist mix and mixes can be saved for offline listening during times without signal such as underground travel, as well as reducing data use and costs.
 
Our apps are currently available on Windows Phone, Windows 8, Nokia Asha phones and the web. We’ve spent years evolving a back-end that we’re incredibly proud of, despite being British! Here's an overview of our back-end architecture.

 

Architecture Overview

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Friday
Aug222014

Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For August 22nd, 2014

Hey, it's HighScalability time:


Exterminate! 1,024 small, mobile, three-legged machines that can move and communicate using infrared laser beams.
  • 1.6 billion: facts in Google's Knowledge Vault built by bots; 100: lightening strikes every second
  • Quotable Quotes:
    • @stevendborrelli: There's a common feeling here at #MesosCon that we at the beginning of a massive shift in the way we manage infrastructure.
    • @deanwampler: 2000 machine service will see > 10 machine crashes per day. Failure is normal. (Google) #Mesoscon
    • @peakscale: "not everything revolves around docker" /booted from room immediately
    • @deanwampler: Twitter has most of their critical infrastructure on Mesos, O(10^4) machines, O(10^5) tasks, O(10^0) SREs supporting it. #Mesoscon
    • @adrianco: Dig yourself a big data hole, then drown in your data lake...
    • bbulkow:  I saw huge Go uptake at OSCON. I met one guy doing log processing easily at 1M records per minute on a single amazon instance, and knew it would scale.
    • @julian_dunn: clearly, running Netflix on a mainframe would have avoided this problem

  • Programming is the new way in an old tradition of using new ideas to explain old mysteries. Take the new Theory of Everything, doesn't it sound a lot like OO programming?: According to constructor theory, the most fundamental components of reality are entities—“constructors”—that perform particular tasks, accompanied by a set of laws that define which tasks are actually possible for a constructor to carry out. Then there's Our Mathematical Universe, which posits that the attributes of objects are the objects: all physical properties of an electron, say, can be described mathematically; therefore, to him, an electron is itself a mathematical structure. Any data modeler knows how faulty is this conceit. We only model our view relative to a problem, not universally. Modelers also have another intuition, that all attributes arise out of relationships between entities and that entities may themselves not have attributes. So maybe physics and programming have something to do with each other after all?

  • Love this. Multi-Datacenter Cassandra on 32 Raspberry Pi’s. Over the top lobby theatrics is a signature Silicon Valley move.

  • Computation is all around us. Jellyfish Use Novel Search Strategy: instead of using a consistent Lévy walk approach, barrel jellyfish also employ a bouncing technique to locate prey. These large jellies ride the currents to a new depth in search of food. If a meal is not located in the new location, the creature rides the currents back to its original location. 

  • Two months early. 300k under budget. Building a custom CMS using a Javascript based Single Page App (SPA), a Clojure back end, a set of small Clojure based micro services sitting on top of MongoDB, hosted in Rackspace.

  • While Twitter may not fight against the impersonation of certain Journalism professors, it does fight spam with a large sword. Here's how that sword of righteousness was forged: Fighting spam with BotMaker. The main challenge: applying rules defined using their own rule language with a low latency. Spam is detected in three stages: real-time, before the tweet enters the system; near real-time, on the write path; periodic, in the background. The result: a 40% reduction in spam and faster response time to new spam attacks.

  • An architecture of small apps. A PHP/Symfony CMS called Megatron takes 10 seconds to render a page. Pervasive slowness leads to constant problems with cache clearing, timeouts, server spin ups and downs, cache warmup. What to do? As an answer an internal Yammer conversation on different options is shared. The major issue is dumping their CMS for a microservices based approach. Interesting discussion that covers a lot of ground.

Don't miss all that the Internet has to say on Scalability, click below and become eventually consistent with all scalability knowledge (which means this post has many more items to read so please keep on reading)...

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Aug202014

Part 2: The Cloud Does Equal High performance

This a guest post by Anshu Prateek, Tech Lead, DevOps at Aerospike and Rajkumar Iyer, Member of the Technical Staff at Aerospike.

In our first post we busted the myth that cloud != high performance and outlined the steps to 1 Million TPS (100% reads in RAM) on 1 Amazon EC2 instance for just $1.68/hr. In this post we evaluate the performance of 4 Amazon instances when running a 4 node Aerospike cluster in RAM with 5 different read/write workloads and show that the r3.2xlarge instance delivers the best price/performance.

Several reports have already documented the performance of distributed NoSQL databases on virtual and bare metal cloud infrastructures:

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Tuesday
Aug192014

Sponsored Post: Apple, Tumblr, Gawker, FoundationDB, Monitis, BattleCry, Surge, Cloudant, CopperEgg, Logentries, Couchbase, MongoDB, BlueStripe, AiScaler, Aerospike, AppDynamics, ManageEngine, Site24x7

Who's Hiring?

  • Apple has multiple openings. Changing the world is all in a day's work at Apple. Imagine what you could do here. 
    • Senior Software Engineer -iOS Systems. Do you love building highly scalable, distributed web applications? Does the idea of a fast-paced environment make your heart leap? Do you want your technical abilities to be challenged every day, and for your work to make a difference in the lives of millions of people? If so, the iOS Systems Carrier Services team is looking for a talented software engineer who is not afraid to share knowledge, think outside the box, and question assumptions. Please apply here.
    • Software Engineering Manager, IS&T WWDR Dev Systems. The WWDR development team is seeking a hands-on engineering manager with a passion for building large-scale, high-performance applications. The successful candidate will be collaborating with Worldwide Developer Relations (WWDR) and various engineering teams throughout Apple. You will lead a team of talented engineers to define and build large-scale web services and applications. Please apply here.
    • C++ Senior Developer and Architect- Maps. The Maps Team is looking for a senior developer and architect to support and grow some of the core backend services that support Apple Map's Front End Services. Ideal candidate would have experience with system architecture, as well as the design, implementation, and testing of individual components but also be comfortable with multiple scripting languages. Please apply here.
    • Site Reliability Engineer. The iOS Systems team is building out a Site Reliability organization. In this role you will be expected to work hand-in-hand with the teams across all phases of the project lifecycle to support systems and to take ownership as they move from QA through integrated testing, certification and production.  Please apply here.

  • Make Tumblr fast, reliable and available for hundreds of millions of visitors and tens of millions of users. As a Site Reliability Engineer you are a software developer with a love of highly performant, fault-tolerant, massively distributed systems. Apply here.

  • Systems & Networking Lead at Gawker. We are looking for someone to take the initiative on the lowest layers of the Kinja platform. All the way down to power and up through hardware, networking, load-balancing, provisioning and base-configuration. The goal for this quarter is a roughly 30% capacity expansion, and the goal for next quarter will be a rolling CentOS7 upgrade as well as to planning/quoting/pitching our 2015 footprint and budget. For the full job spec and to apply, click here: http://grnh.se/t8rfbw

  • BattleCry, the newest ZeniMax studio in Austin, is seeking a qualified Front End Web Engineer to help create and maintain our web presence for AAA online games. This includes the game accounts web site, enhancing the studio website, our web and mobile- based storefront, and front end for support tools. http://jobs.zenimax.com/requisitions/view/540

  • FoundationDB is seeking outstanding developers to join our growing team and help us build the next generation of transactional database technology. You will work with a team of exceptional engineers with backgrounds from top CS programs and successful startups. We don’t just write software. We build our own simulations, test tools, and even languages to write better software. We are well-funded, offer competitive salaries and option grants. Interested? You can learn more here.

  • UI EngineerAppDynamics, founded in 2008 and lead by proven innovators, is looking for a passionate UI Engineer to design, architect, and develop our their user interface using the latest web and mobile technologies. Make the impossible possible and the hard easy. Apply here.

  • Software Engineer - Infrastructure & Big DataAppDynamics, leader in next generation solutions for managing modern, distributed, and extremely complex applications residing in both the cloud and the data center, is looking for a Software Engineers (All-Levels) to design and develop scalable software written in Java and MySQL for backend component of software that manages application architectures. Apply here.

Fun and Informative Events

  • OmniTI has a reputation for scalable web applications and architectures, but we still lean on our friends and peers to see how things can be done better. Surge started as the brainchild of our employees wanting to bring the best and brightest in Web Operations to our own backyard. Now in its fifth year, Surge has become the conference on scalability and performance. Early Bird rate in effect until 7/24!

Cool Products and Services

  • Get your Black Belt in NoSQL. Couchbase Learning Services presents hands-on training for mission-critical NoSQL. This is the fastest, most reliable way to gain skills in advanced NoSQL application development and systemsoperation, through expert instruction with hands-on practical labs, in a structured learning environment. Trusted training. From Couchbase. View the schedule, read attendee testimonials & enroll now.

  • Now track your log activities with Log Monitor and be on the safe side! Monitor any type of log file and proactively define potential issues that could hurt your business' performance. Detect your log changes for: Error messages, Server connection failures, DNS errors, Potential malicious activity, and much more. Improve your systems and behaviour with Log Monitor.

  • The NoSQL "Family Tree" from Cloudant explains the NoSQL product landscape using an infographic. The highlights: NoSQL arose from "Big Data" (before it was called "Big Data"); NoSQL is not "One Size Fits All"; Vendor-driven versus Community-driven NoSQL.  Create a free Cloudant account and start the NoSQL goodness

  • Finally, log management and analytics can be easy, accessible across your team, and provide deep insights into data that matters across the business - from development, to operations, to business analytics. Create your free Logentries account here.

  • CopperEgg. Simple, Affordable Cloud Monitoring. CopperEgg gives you instant visibility into all of your cloud-hosted servers and applications. Cloud monitoring has never been so easy: lightweight, elastic monitoring; root cause analysis; data visualization; smart alerts. Get Started Now.

  • Whitepaper Clarifies ACID Support in Aerospike. In our latest whitepaper, author and Aerospike VP of Engineering & Operations, Srini Srinivasan, defines ACID support in Aerospike, and explains how Aerospike maintains high consistency by using techniques to reduce the possibility of partitions. 

  • BlueStripe FactFinder Express is the ultimate tool for server monitoring and solving performance problems. Monitor URL response times and see if the problem is the application, a back-end call, a disk, or OS resources.

  • aiScaler, aiProtect, aiMobile Application Delivery Controller with integrated Dynamic Site Acceleration, Denial of Service Protection and Mobile Content Management. Cloud deployable. Free instant trial, no sign-up required.  http://aiscaler.com/

  • ManageEngine Applications Manager : Monitor physical, virtual and Cloud Applications.

  • www.site24x7.com : Monitor End User Experience from a global monitoring network.

If any of these items interest you there's a full description of each sponsor below. Please click to read more...

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Monday
Aug182014

1 Aerospike server X 1 Amazon EC2 instance = 1 Million TPS for just $1.68/hour

This a guest post by Anshu Prateek, Tech Lead, DevOps at Aerospike and Rajkumar Iyer, Member of the Technical Staff at Aerospike.

Cloud infrastructure services like Amazon EC2 have proven their worth with wild success. The ease of scaling up resources, spinning them up as and when needed and paying by unit of time has unleashed developer creativity, but virtualized environments are not widely considered as the place to run high performance applications and databases.

Cloud providers however have come a long way in their offerings and need a second review of their performance capabilities. After showing 1 Million TPS on Aerospike on bare metal servers, we decided to investigate cloud performance and in the process, bust the myth that cloud != high performance.

We examined a variety of Amazon instances and just discovered the recipe for processing 1 Million TPS in RAM on 1 Aerospike server on a single C3.8xlarge instance - for just $1.68/hr !!!

According to internetlivestats.com, there are 7.5k new tweets per second, 45k google searches per second and 2.3 Million emails sent per second. What would you build if you could process 1 Million database transactions per second for just $1.68/hr?

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Friday
Aug152014

Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For August 15th, 2014

Hey, it's HighScalability time:


Somehow this seems quite appropriate. (via John Bredehoft)
  • 75 acres: Pizza eaten in US daily; 270TB: Backblaze storage pod; 14nm: Intel extends Moore's Law
  • Quotable Quotes
    • discreteevent: The dream of reuse has made a mess of many systems.
    • David Crawley: Don't think of Moore's Law in terms of technology; think of it in terms of economics and you get much greater understanding. The limits of Moore's Law is not driven by current technology. The limits of Moore's Law are really a matter of cost.
    • Simon Brown: If you can't build a monolith, what makes you think microservices are the answer?
    • smileysteve: The net result is that you should be able to transmit QPSK at 32GBd in 2 polarizations in maybe 80 waves in each direction. 2bits x 2 polarizations x 32G ~128Gb/s per wave or nearly 11Tb/s for 1 fiber. If this cable has 6 strands, then it could easily meet the target transmission capacity [60TB].
    • Eric Brumer: Highly efficient code is actually memory efficient code.

  • How to be a cloud optimist. Tell yourself: an instance is half full, it's not half empty; Downtime is temporary; Failures aren't your fault.

  • Mother Earth, Motherboard by Neal Stephenson. Goes without saying it's gorgeously written. The topic: The hacker tourist ventures forth across the wide and wondrous meatspace of three continents, chronicling the laying of the longest wire on Earth. < Related to Google Invests In $300M Submarine Cable To Improve Connection Between Japan And The US.

  • IBM compares virtual machines and against Linux containers: Our results show that containers result in equal or better performance than VM in almost all cases. Both VMs and containers require tuning to support I/O-intensive applications.

  • Does Psychohistory begin with BigData? Of a crude kind, perhaps. Google uses BigQuery to uncover patterns of world history: What’s even more amazing is that this analysis is not the result of a massive custom-built parallel application built by a team of specialized HPC programmers and requiring a dedicated cluster to run on: in stark contrast, it is the result of a single line of SQL code (plus a second line to create the initial “view”). All of the complex parallelism, data management, and IO optimization is handled transparently by Google BigQuery. Imagine that – a single line of SQL performing 2.5 million correlations in just 2.5 minutes to uncover the underlying patterns of global society.

  • Fabian Giesen with an deep perspective on how communication has evolved to use a similar pattern. Networks all the way down (part2): anything we would call a computer these days is in fact, for all practical purposes, a heterogeneous cluster made up of various specialized smaller computers, all connected using various networks that go by different names and are specified in different standards, yet are all suspiciously similar at the architecture level; a fractal of switched, packet-based networks of heterogeneous nodes that make up what we call a single “computer”. It means that all the network security problems that plague inter-computer networking also exist within computers themselves. Implementations may change substantially over time, the interfaces – protocols, to stay within our networking terminology – stay mostly constant over large time scales, warts and all.

Don't miss all that the Internet has to say on Scalability, click below and become eventually consistent with all scalability knowledge (which means this post has many more items to read so please keep on reading)...

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Aug132014

Hamsterdb: An Analytical Embedded Key-value Store

 

In this post, I’d like to introduce you to hamsterdb, an Apache 2-licensed, embedded analytical key-value database library similar to Google's leveldb and Oracle's BerkeleyDB.

hamsterdb is not a new contender in this niche. In fact, hamsterdb has been around for over 9 years. In this time, it has dramatically grown, and the focus has shifted from a pure key-value store to an analytical database offering functionality similar to a column store database. 

hamsterdb is single-threaded and non-distributed, and users usually link it directly into their applications. hamsterdb offers a unique (at least, as far as I know) implementation of Transactions, as well as other unique features similar to column store databases, making it a natural fit for analytical workloads. It can be used natively from C/C++ and has bindings for Erlang, Python, Java, .NET, and even Ada. It is used in embedded devices and on-premise applications with millions of deployments, as well as serving in cloud instances for caching and indexing.

hamsterdb has a unique feature in the key-value niche: it understands schema information. While most databases do not know or care what kind of keys are inserted, hamsterdb supports key types for binary keys...

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Monday
Aug112014

The Easy Way of Building a Growing Startup Architecture Using HAProxy, PHP, Redis and MySQL to Handle 1 Billion Requests a Week

This Case Study is a guest post written by Antoni Orfin, Co-Founder and Software Architect at Octivi

In the post I'll show you the way we developed quite simple architecture based on HAProxy, PHP, Redis and MySQL that seamlessly handles approx 1 billion requests every week. There’ll be also a note of the possible ways of further scaling it out and pointed uncommon patterns, that are specific for this project.

Stats:

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