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Entries in aws (3)

Tuesday
Nov052013

10 Things You Should Know About AWS

Authored by Chris Fregly:  Former Netflix Streaming Platform Engineer, AWS Certified Solution Architect and Purveyor of fluxcapacitor.com.

Ahead of the upcoming 2nd annual re:Invent conference, inspired by Simone Brunozzi’s recent presentation at an AWS Meetup in San Francisco, and collected from a few of my recent Fluxcapacitor.com consulting engagements, I’ve compiled a list of 10 useful time and clock-tick saving tips about AWS.

1) Query AWS resource metadata

 

Can’t remember the EBS-Optimized IO throughput of your c1.xlarge cluster?  How about the size limit of an S3 object on a single PUT?  awsnow.info is the answer to all of your AWS-resource metadata questions.  Interested in integrating awsnow.info with your application?  You’re in luck.  There’s now a REST API, as well!

Note:  These are default soft limits and will vary by account.

2) Tame your S3 buckets

 

Delete an entire S3 bucket with a single CLI command:  

aws s3 rb s3://<bucket-name> --force

Recursively copy a local directory to S3:

aws s3 cp <local-dir-name> s3://<bucket-name> --region <region-name> --recursive

3) Understand AWS cross-region dependencies

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
May262010

End-To-End Performance Study of Cloud Services

Cloud computing promises a number of advantages for the deployment of data-intensive applications. Most prominently, these include reducing cost with a pay-as-you-go business model and (virtually) unlimited throughput by adding servers if the workload increases. At the Systems Group, ETH Zurich, we did an extensive end-to-end performance study to compare the major cloud offerings regarding their ability to fulfill these promises and their implied cost.

Click to read more ...

Thursday
May062010

Going global on EC2

Since its inception, Amazon EC2 has enabled companies to run highly scalable infrastructure with minimal overhead.  Over the years, Amazon Web Services has expanded with new offerings and additional regions around the world.

All this growth has made establishing a global footprint easier than ever.  And yet, most EC2 customers still choose to operate in a single region.  While this is fine for many applications, customers with significant web infrastructure are depriving users of drastically improved performance.  Deploying infrastructure in EC2's new regions cuts out one of the biggest sources of latency: distance.

In this post, I describe how Bizo significantly reduced load times by implementing Global Server Load Balancing (GSLB) to distribute traffic across all Amazon regions.