Entries in nosql (12)

Wednesday
Dec302009

Terrastore - Scalable, elastic, consistent document store.

Terrastore is a new-born document store which provides advanced scalability and elasticity features without sacrificing consistency.

Here are a few highlights:

  • Ubiquitous: based on the universally supported HTTP protocol.
  • Distributed: nodes can run and live everywhere on your network.
  • Elastic: you can add and remove nodes dynamically to/from your running cluster with no downtime and no changes at all to your configuration.
  • Scalable at the data layer: documents are partitioned and distributed among your nodes, with automatic and transparent re-balancing when nodes join and leave.
  • Scalable at the computational layer: query and update operations are distributed to the nodes which actually holds the queried/updated data, minimizing network traffic and spreading computational load.
  • Consistent: providing per-document consistency, you're guaranteed to always get the latest value of a single document, with read committed isolation for concurrent modifications.
  • Schemaless: providing a collection-based interface holding JSON documents with no pre-defined schema, you can just create your collections and put everything you want into.
  • Easy operations: install a fully working cluster in just a few commands and no XML to edit.
  • Features rich: support for push-down predicates, range queries and server-side update functions.

Read, participate, download and clone it!

Thursday
Oct292009

Digg - Looking to the Future with Cassandra

Digg has been researching ways to scale our database infrastructure for some time now. We’ve adopted a traditional vertically partitioned master-slave configuration with MySQL, and also investigated sharding MySQL with IDDB. Ultimately, these solutions left us wanting. In the case of the traditional architecture, the lack of redundancy on the write masters is painful, and both approaches have significant management overhead to keep running.

Since it was already necessary to abandon data normalization and consistency to make these approaches work, we felt comfortable looking at more exotic, non-relational data stores. After considering HBase, Hypertable, Cassandra, Tokyo Cabinet/Tyrant, Voldemort, and Dynomite, we settled on Cassandra.

Each system has its own strengths and weaknesses, but Cassandra has a good blend of everything. It offers column-oriented data storage, so you have a bit more structure than plain key/value stores. It operates in a distributed, highly available, peer-to-peer cluster. While it’s currently lacking some core features, it gets us closer to where we want to be than the other solutions.

continue... 

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