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Friday
Jan212011

PaaS shouldn’t be built in Silos

Unlike many of the existing Platforms, in this second-generation phase, its not going to be enough to package and bundle different individual middleware services and products (Web Containers, Messaging, Data, Monitoring, Automation and Control, Provisioning) and brand them under the same name to make them look as one. (Fusion? Fabric? A rose is a rose by any other name - and in this case, it's not a rose.)

The second-generation PaaS needs to come with a holistic approach that couples all those things together and provide a complete holistic experience. By that I mean that if I add a machine into cluster, I need to see that as an increase in capacity on my entire application stack, the monitoring system needs to discover that new machine and start monitoring it without any configuration setup, the load-balancer need to add it to its pool and so forth.

Our challenge as technologists would be to move from our current siloed comfort zone. That applies not just to the way we design our application architecture but to the way we build our development teams, and the way we evaluate new technologies. Those who are going to be successful are those who are going to design and measure how well all their technology pieces work together before anything else, and who look at a solution without reverence for past designs.

full story ...

Reader Comments (1)

PaaS 1.0 is like the public telephone booths of yesteryear. Its starts out terribly expensive but all new, shiny & clean. Very quickly it becomes soiled by its multi-tenancy, lack of policing & maintenance, its limited (crapped) space & capacity, its lack of adaptability (upgrading is a bitch because its controlled by a single authority) to innovations elsewhere, and then there is all those business (card) adverts for questionable services plastered all over it. What's amazing you continue to pay the same expensive call rate while it goes through this lifecycle process.

February 3, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterWilliam Louth

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